Monday, 7 July 2014

Read the Words and Blame the Victim!

O.J. Simpson is selling a videotape that he claims reveals "his side" of his murder case - and it's sparking a storm of controversy around America.

Simpson's pushing the tape for $29.95. But here for ENQUIRER readers are key word-for-word excerpts from what O.J. has to say on the tape - and an analysis of evidence that refutes his claims.

Questioned by interviewer Ross Becker at O.J.'s Rockingham home, the convicted wife-beater actually denies that Nicole Simpson was terrified when she made the now famous 911 call in 1993 - after O.J. broke down her door. The former football great even claims HE was the battered spouse.

O.J.: "That is a problem that when I am free to speak, I plan to speak to women's groups. Battery is just not a one-way street. I think it is more an attitude than anything. Just because it doesn't hurt when someone hits you, when someone slaps you in front of people, it is abusive to you - all that constitutes battery."

This is a "ridiculous" comment frequently made by abusers, said Dr. Lynn M. Appleton, associate professor of sociology at Florida Atlantic University and an expert on domestic violence.

"It distorts the reality of violence between men and women in a very serious way. In our culture men learn how to be violent.
"Batterers generally believe that the victim had it coming. That is what O.J. is doing - it's very common behaviour to blame the battering on the battered person."

O.J., staring straight into the camera, also states: "Go to all the people who ever lived with Nicole and I. Go to all her friends. Go to Nicole's words."

All right, let's go to Nicole's words, O.J.

In her secret diary - revealed in The ENQUIRER last October, Nicole catalogs numerous incidents of abuse at the hands of Simpson, writing:
"Beat me so bad...  Smashed my car w/ Baseball bat... Ripped all clothes off me... Called Mother Whore hit me while F----- me... Beat me on bed kept hitting me until police came... threw me against wall threw me on floor..."

The National Enquirer
March 5 1996

Nicole Brown Simpson... The Story Continues!

Sunday, 6 July 2014

Out of the Shadows, a 911 Call and the Fear of Nicole Brown Simpson...

The voice is, by turns angry, exasperated, terrified and, finally resigned. It is her second 911 call within 10 minutes.

In the background, a man is screaming - about children, tabloids, an old boyfriend. The words are only semi-audible, but his rage needs no amplification.

"Could you get someone over here now, to 325 Gretna Green. He's back. Please", asks Nicole Simpson.

"What does he look like?" asks the operator.

"He's O.J. Simpson. I think you know his record", she says with a tremor of panic. Simpson she explains, had broken down the back door of her house.

"Is he threatening you?"

She begins to sob. "He's fucking going nuts."

The Simpson case continued to obsess the nation last week.


Details of Nicole Simpson's troubled and violent marriage also emerged in sharper relief last week. 

One friend told NEWSWEEK of an ugly incident at daughter Sydney's school around the time of the 1992 divorce in which  O.J. stormed up to his wife and yanked her arm so hard that she nearly fell.

Accounts of her last days suggest a woman bent on making a clean break from the volatile Simpson.

Denise Brown told The New York Times her sister had broken up with Simpson a week and a half before she died. She also put her $625,000 town house up for lease in early June, just five months after she'd bought it.

"Drop-dead gorgeous New York style townhouse in heart of Brentwood" for $4,800 a month, said a description listed by her real-estate agent.

But whatever her plans, whatever her fears, time ran out on the evening of June 12.

Newsweek Magazine
July 4 1994

*FURTHER READING*

Although advocacy groups are already claiming that Nicole Simpson's case can do for spousal abuse what Rock Hudson did for AIDS and Anita Hill did for sexual harassment, that may be more rhetoric than reality; there is great ambivalence about family violence... 

...The unwritten code that a man's home is his castle and what happens inside should stay there.

So many look away because they don't know what constitutes domestic violence.
Who's a victim? Who's an abuser?

Newsweek Magazine
July 4 1994

Saturday, 28 June 2014

Nicole, a Model Victim of Abuse...

"I'm afraid he's going to kill me!" 
That's what Nicole Simpson told her therapist Susan Forward about her terrifying fear of O.J. Simpson.

And just days before the football great's ex-wife was brutally murdered, she spurned O.J.'s pleas for a reconciliation and echoed the same fear to a friend: "I'm really afraid one day he'll go too far and kill me!"

"O.J. constantly battered her," said Forward, the therapist who counseled Nicole when she was going through her divorce from the star in 1992. 

"She was terrified of him. He constantly threatened her life. She told me, 'O.J. is so insanely possessive and jealous that there's no telling what he might do. He gets so angry I know he could kill me someday.'"


Nicole was a typical battered wife - and O.J., 46, had a "classic case of obsession," said Forward, author of the book "Obsessive Love: When It Hurts Too Much To Let Go."

"After they separated, O.J. kept pursuing her," Forward told The ENQUIRER... She was living in terror. he was always accusing her of seeing other men. If she went to a gas station to get gas for her car; O.J. would demand to know if she was seeing the gas station attendant and there'd be a big fight!

"When she was seeing me, Nicole still had a lot of loving feelings for O.J. She kept seeking the love of the man who beat her.

"Nicole would lie curled up on my couch in a fetal position, crying, with no make-up, torn jeans and stringy hair. She looked like a helpless waif.

"She was trembling in fear when she told me, 'I'm trying to get my life together. But it's on my mind every minute - what is O.J. going to do next?'"...

The National Enquirer
June 28 1994




Sunday, 15 June 2014

The Football Association Gives the Red Card to Domestic Abuse...

The Football Association has backed Women’s Aid's campaign to raise awareness of domestic violence and battle the sexist attitudes that underpin abuse against women.

Working alongside a number of football clubs, organisations, players and fans – Women’s Aid will encourage the football community to speak out publicly against domestic violence in society in order to make football a place where perpetrators of domestic abuse are not welcome.


In backing the campaign, FA general secretary Alex Horne said football has a key role to play in tackling such a serious problem.

“At The FA we know what enormous power the footballing community has to make positive change and we welcome this important campaign,” he said.

“Domestic violence affects all of our society and football, especially as the World Cup approaches, has the potential to reach a huge proportion of the public.

“We can all make a difference by signing up to the Football United Against Domestic Violence campaign - clubs, fans and players - to bring domestic violence out from behind closed doors.”

Women’s Aid is asking clubs to get involved by signing the Football United Club Pledge to send a clear message that domestic violence is completely unacceptable.

The pledge also encourages clubs to help break the silence that allows domestic violence to continue and provide positive role models of younger people in the community.

Another advocate of the campaign is former England goalkeeper David James, who said the world of football must play its part.

He said: “All forms of domestic violence are completely unacceptable, and it is shocking to think that there is a rise in reporting following England games.

“I wholeheartedly support the Football United Against Domestic Violence campaign, and hope that clubs get involved and work with Women’s Aid to help raise awareness with their supporters.”

The FA has backed a number of initiatives and Horne added that the organisation is delighted to be part of another worthy campaign.

He added: “We are keen to promote social change through football and our new Inclusion Advisory Board already supports well known campaigns such as Kick It Out and Football v Homophobia; we are proud to now add Football United Against Domestic Violence to that list.”


Women's Aid Speaks Out Against Domestic Abuse and the World Cup...

The World Cup has kicked off in Brazil, and the media is awash with questions over the connection between sporting events and domestic violence and abuse.


At the same time, our sisters in Women’s Aid England have launched  their Football United Against Domestic Violence campaign, urging football clubs and supporters to pledge to send a clear message that domestic violence is always unacceptable and will not be tolerated in silence. 

It is a positive sign that we as a society are speaking openly about domestic violence, and that football clubs and supporters are standing with women and demanding zero tolerance to domestic abuse.

In Northern Ireland, Women’s Aid frequently sees a spike in the reporting of domestic violence during major sporting events like the World Cup, similar to the increase in reports of violence witnessed by other Women’s Aid organisations across the UK.

In our experience, the combination of risen tensions when watching matches and excessive alcohol consumption create an environment where perpetrators of abuse are more likely to commit extreme acts of physical violence.

This doesn’t mean that football causes domestic violence – in the vast majority of cases, domestic violence will already be present in the relationship, whether that is in the form of psychological, financial, emotional, physical or sexual abuse. What events like the World Cup do is act as an excuse for perpetrators to commit physical violence, and lower their inhibitions so that the violence is more extreme.

There is a growing awareness in Northern Ireland of the horror that is domestic violence, and we are increasingly becoming a society that demands zero tolerance to this heinous crime. Women’s Aid Federation Northern Ireland calls on the the PSNI to vigorously prosecute anyone who perpetrates domestic violence during the World Cup, or at any other time, and bring perpetrators to justice.

Our message to anyone suffering domestic abuse is that help is out there.
The 24 Hour Domestic & Sexual Violence Helpline is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to all women and men affected by domestic or sexual violence. You can call our confidential helpline on 0808 802 1414, email 24hrsupport@dvhelpline.org or text support to 07797 805 839.

Our Women’s Aid network can also provide women and their children with refuge and outreach support in their local area and help with safety planning and rebuilding your life after domestic violence.

The Ugly Face of England's Beautiful Game...

With the World Cup nearly upon us, Polly Neate, chief executive of Women's Aid, explains why the charity is dedicated to changing football culture and working with the Premier League, in spite of Richard Scudamore's sexist comments.


Football is core to the nation’s identity, but it certainly isn't one that offers equal voice and opportunity to men and women. It is largely dominated by male players, male managers and big organisations such as the Premier League which are headed up by male chief executives such as Richard Scudamore.

At Women’s Aid, we were appalled by the sexist and derogatory language which was used in several of Scudamore's leaked emails, as we had just started to work with the Premier League to campaign against domestic violence and the sexist attitudes that underpin violence against women. So, does this mean we stop working with the Premier League? No, it means the opposite. It means we have some serious work to do.

With the World Cup only a few weeks away, Women’s Aid is launching a full-on campaign with the football community to coincide with the beginning of the tournament. Our partnership will focus on combatting domestic violence - which we know is a significant problem after games.

It is very easy to dismiss sexist comments as japes or as comments which have been taken out of context, but they can have a significant impact on our culture. Within football, sexist attitudes can stop women feeling welcome at football grounds, no matter how much female fans they love the game. Casual comments on Twitter with the hashtag #evertonwivesrunforyourlives and ‘jokes’ about convicted rapist Ched Evans, the former Sheffield United and Wales striker, coming back “to rape your defences” only serve to trivialise violence against women, which affects at least one in four women at some point in their lifetime.

We believe that these voices come from a minority and that many people would never dream of being sexist or abusive. The footballing community is of course a massive cross-section of society, made up of both the good and the bad.
However, we also know that it is often the minority that we hear the loudest, and this is why it is so important that everyone else speaks out.

This is why we are currently working with a number of partners within football, including the Premier League, to, excuse the pun, tackle abusive behaviour and attitudes towards women, both within the context of the footballing world and in society more generally. 

We have thought long and hard about continuing the partnership, and we have come to the conclusion that walking away won’t achieve anything. We will work with the Premier League to develop workplace policies that directly address sexism and violence against women, and we are aiming to have real long-term impact in the football community through our campaigning work.

We hope the widespread criticism of the comments made in Scudamore’s email conversations mean that calling out sexism is becoming less of a minority sport.

Women's Aid is the national domestic violence charity that co-ordinates and supports an England-wide network of over 250 local services working to end domestic violence against women and children. For more information, or help if you’re experiencing domestic violence, visit www.womensaid.org.uk

Time to 'Kick Off' AGAINST Domestic Abuse!

Police are issuing personal warnings to men and women with a record of domestic violence in the runup to England's first World Cup game, acting on evidence that abuse against wives, girlfriends and partners spikes dramatically in the aftermath of matches – whether the team wins or loses.

The most detailed research into the links between the football World Cup and domestic abuse rates has revealed that in one force area in England and Wales, violent incidents increased by 38% when England lost – but also rose by 26% when they won.


The research, by Lancaster University criminologist Dr Stuart Kirby, a former police officer, monitored police reports of domestic violence during the last three World Cups in 2002, 2006 and 2010.

While domestic violence rose after each England game, incidents also increased in frequency at each new tournament, raising fears that the forthcoming competition in Brazil – where England's first game is against Italy on Saturday 14 June – could see the highest ever World Cup-related rises in domestic violence across the UK.

Separate national research examining the 2010 World Cup echoed the Kirby findings – with domestic abuse reports up 27.7% when the England team won a game, and 31.5% when they lost.

The research is being used by some police forces to try to prevent attacks.

In Essex, police are putting on extra patrols during and after England's first match and placing domestic violence intelligence teams in police control rooms.

In the past few weeks, officers have drawn up a list of 117 high-risk and high-frequency perpetrators – 110 men and seven women – using intelligence drawn from domestic abuse data, risk assessments and football violence data.

The individuals will be visited at home by officers and warned not to vent their feelings on their partners. Essex police are also running a high-profile social media and advertising campaign – informed by interviews with victims of domestic abuse – to raise awareness of the crime's prevalence, highlight that victims can be male, female, gay or straight, and call on the public to stand together to fight it.

Chief Constable Stephen Kavanagh said: "These trends are well established and the worrying thing is there is an increase from tournament to tournament. We have to ask – are perpetrators becoming increasingly confident? Are we seeing intergenerational abusers?

"One of the things that we are looking at is around learned behaviour and this is causing us concern. Are there now people who have seen their parent behave in this way during tournaments who now think it is acceptable for them to do the same?

"There's a mixture of factors that come together during a World Cup tournament; many people drink, there is the emotional stress of the game, and there is a whole issue around competitiveness and testosterone levels. Most people will watch the game and will never do anything violent but a small minority will become deeply aggressive and unpleasant.

"What we are trying to do is predict some of this. We are taking a forthright approach, we know who the high-risk perpetrators are and we are visiting them to say effectively: We know who you are, we know where you are and we know what you are capable of.

"I cannot guarantee we won't have a tragedy during the World Cup but we are working with victims, targeting perpetrators, working with partners to share information more effectively and try to better protect victims."

Kavanagh expects incidents of domestic violence to rise from an average of 85 calls a day by up to 22 more reports if the England team wins and up to 35 more if the team loses. His officers will wear body cameras to improve evidence-gathering and take the pressure off victims by providing independent evidence of violence. The force has seen a 30% increase in guilty pleas relating to domestic violence since using the equipment.

Other forces are also running billboard awareness-raising campaigns in an attempt to combat the expected rise of violence against women during England games.

In Lancashire – where during the 2010 tournament domestic abuse rose by 25% – billboards in Blackpool, Blackburn and Preston will tell domestic abuse offenders to: "Leave the striking to the players."

Bus shelter posters will urge victims, friends and family to: "Blow the whistle on domestic abuse."

Kirby said: "If you are a violent individual who commits domestic violence, then you are more likely to do it over the next couple of weeks.

"But because the tournament increases the causative factors for domestic abuse, there will be people who get involved in domestic abuse for the first time during England games."

He said high-profile campaigns by police forces and other agencies could reduce the violence, adding: "You can be deterred from committing the crime if someone increases your risk of detection – both by visiting perpetrators as Essex are doing and by putting information out there, flashing it across the screen, putting it on billboards, raising awareness among the public.

"The offender needs to know there are ramifications and having the message out there can deter offending and make victims less vulnerable because they know other people are in the same situation and they know they can call for help."

• This article was amended on 9 June, 2014, to give add Stuart Kirby's current position at Lancaster University


Taking a Strike Against Domestic Abuse...

Police forces across the country have set up initiatives aimed at preventing violence in the home during England’s World Cup matches after research found that there is a significant rise in the number of domestic violence cases when the national team play in the tournament.

According to the study published this week by Lancaster University, it was found that incidents of domestic abuse rose by 38 per cent when the England team played and lost when compared with the days that England did not play.

The study also reported that there was a carry-over effect, with an 11 per cent rise in cases of domestic abuse the day after a match.


To combat these increases in domestic violence rates, forces in Essex, Manchester and Northumbria have all set up their own World Cup task forces to ensure that fans can enjoy England’s matches orderly and safely throughout the World Cup.

Essex Police has said that they had planned carefully to ensure that they had the right number of police working at key stages of the World Cup and will deploy 75 extra officers specifically tonight’s game.

Chief superintendent Andy Prophet said: "I hope everyone enjoys the World Cup but experience tells us we need to plan for the minority who spoil things. Very often drinking too much alcohol is at the root of the problem.”

"Anyone who does overstep the mark, spoiling the match for everyone else, will be dealt with promptly and professionally by officers. Where appropriate, that will include pursuing matters through the court system."

Northumbria police launched their Kick Off campaign this week to coincide with the start of the tournament.

The campaign will see dedicated vehicles on standby to respond to calls of domestic violence when England are playing in the tournament.

Greater Manchester Police has said that they will also be deploying a specialist unit to tackle domestic violence during the football.

During the last World Cup in 2010 the police recorded 353 incidents of domestic abuse on the day England were knocked out by Germany.

In addition to this, almost 6,000 calls were made to police - a 43 per cent increase on the average number over a 24-hour period for a typical Sunday in June.

North West Ambulance Service observed a similar spike, with a 34 per cent increase in the number of assaults after England were eliminated.

Thursday, 12 June 2014

Nicole Brown Simpson Remembered...

“Life is painful and messed up. It gets complicated at the worst of times, and sometimes you have no idea where to go or what to do. Lots of times people just let themselves get lost, dropping into a wide open, huge abyss. But that's why we have to keep trying. 

We have to push through all that hurts us, work past all our memories that are haunting us. Sometimes the things that hurt us are the things that make us strongest. 

A life without experience, in my opinion, is no life at all. And that's why I tell everyone that, even when it hurts, never stop yourself from living.”

Alysha Speer


‘Death Ends a Life, Not a Relationship’
Never Forgotten!




Thursday, 7 November 2013

Blame the Victim! The Story of Nicole Brown Simpson Continues...

A tormented Nicole Brown poured her heart out to O.J. Simpson in a series of secret love letters that STAR is revealing for the first time.
In the haunting collection, written in the years between the couple's 1992 divorce and her murder last year, Nicole tells the man who abused and beat her that "I know nobody will ever love me the way that you do."

"Nicole wrote them as a form of therapy for herself," a source tells STAR. "She was trying to work through her feelings - good and bad - for O.J., and she just needed to put some things down on paper."

But counseling experts said Nicole's heartbreaking attempts to rationalize the abuse - and even convince Simpson that many of their problems were her fault - were classic signs of the battered woman syndrome.

In one of the poignant letters - found by her sister Dominique when she was clearing out Nicole's belongings from her Bundy Drive home - Nicole even tells Simpson that she likes it when he loses his temper and explodes in rage.

"I know that we have had our fights, our tough and rocky times," she writes, according to the source who saw the letters. "But I have to be honest and admit that it's a turn-on when you get angry, because it shows how much you care about me."


Joy Brown, a top clinical psychologist who hosts a daily radio advice show, says Nicole's reaction to Simpson's abuse is typical of battered women. "Both parties blame the victim," Brown says.

"She says to herself: 'No one has ever treated me this way before, so it must be me. I must be doing something that irritates him,' So she has identified with the aggressor.

"Oddly enough, that's not an uncommon phenomenon for a woman to identify with her abuser.
"He says: 'You make me do this. It's your fault. It's because I love you so much.' Because a woman wants so much to hear that the man loves her, she often accepts this.

"She winds up saying she's sorry for all the pain she's caused him. Yet he's the one causing her pain," Brown adds.

She says a surprising number of women put up with this kind of treatment. "Women want very much to be loved and we think the violence is just an  aberration. The contrast between what the man seems like when he hits us and what he's like the next day is really dramatic!

"It's usually kind of an obsessive relationship to begin with, an intense, intimate relationship. He says: 'I can't live without you, I want to be with you all the time. I can't bear to see you around anybody else.' It's very flattering, very seductive. In the beginning, it sounds really cool.

"And even when the man starts becoming a little violent, the woman makes a trade-off in her own mind. She tells herself he's being possessive because he loves her so much."


"And very often, the first time the man hits the woman, he is so remorseful, with promises it will never happen again. This is often followed by a long spell of being particularly attentive and loving. She gets soothed into thinking this will never happen again. And, of course, if it happens once, it will certainly happen again.

"They are really so apologetic. And because she really cares about the guy and he seems to be offering so much, the victim can really get sucked in."

Star Magazine
November 7 1995

Thursday, 31 October 2013

Nicole Brown Simpson's Impossible Dream...

Despite all of Nicole Simpson's suffering, she still hoped to transform O.J. into a kind and loving man - and that's the impossible dream of every battered woman, reveal experts.

After reading Nicole's heart-wrenching diary, respected Los Angeles attorney Melanie Lomax - who's counseled hundreds of battered women - told the ENQUIRER:

"Where her optimism came from, I don't know.
"Given the terror and brutality, I find it difficult to understand why she decided to marry him.
"Nicole talks about O.J. striking her while they're having sex, smashing her car windshield with a baseball bat, throwing her out of the house and chasing and beating her until the police came..."


"But Nicole hoped to turn O.J. around. She saw herself as good for him."

Nicole wrote about behavior that's found in most abusive relationships - including substance abuse, threats and attacks followed by promises that "it won't happen again," noted Lomax.


It's obvious that O.J. still hasn't changed, say experts.
His recent offer to meet with battered women infuriated Tammy Bruce, president of the Los Angeles chapter of the National Organization for Women.

"He's not talking about getting therapy. He's not talking about talking to other men who batter," said Bruce.

"He's always been able to go the woman he battered and charm and win her back. Now that she (Nicole) is dead, he wants to go to others. It is classic batterer behavior."

The National Enquirer
October 31 1995





Friday, 25 October 2013

The Poignant Legacy of Nicole Brown Simpson's Diary...

Nicole Simpson seemed to have it all - beauty, wealth, a famous husband and great children. 
But beneath the glamor was an ugly secret: She suffered the same anguish, despair and fear felt by other abused wives across the nation every day.

After reading the diary, respected Los Angeles attorney Melanie Lomax was near tears. Lomax, who's counseled hundreds of battered women, told The ENQUIRER:

"These entries are tragic and moving. They show Nicole felt trapped in this horribly abusive relationship - but kept hoping that somehow, some way, she'd be able to change O.J. She had a rescuer's complex.
"This is a common characteristic of battered women. And there are many others in the diary.

"For example Nicole tried desperately to be perfect because that's what O.J. demanded. He wanted a Barbie Doll who always had her hair combed right, never left her shoes around and didn't even gain weight when she was pregnant!


It made me take a look at my life with you - my wonderful life with the Superstar, that wonderful man O.J. Simpson, the father of my kids - that husband of that terribly insecure girl - the girl with no self esteem or self worth - she must be all those things to with a guy like that. And certainly no one would be envious of that life...
Nicole Brown Simpson

"It's significant that Nicole talks of losing her self-esteem, or how her confidence was destroyed by O.J. when she didn't become the model of perfection he wanted.

"But hope springs eternal. Nicole kept thinking about the great times in between the abuse. She wanted to keep the marriage together for the sake of their children."

The National Enquirer
October 25 1995



Thursday, 17 October 2013

The National Enquirer and the Story of Nicole Brown Simpson...

Like the Anita Hill testimony and the trials of William Kennedy Smith, Mike Tyson, Lorena Bobbitt, the Menendez brothers and Susan Smith, the Simpson trial had become another national battle-by-proxy for unresolved social conflicts: racial and sexual injustice; the meaning of rape, sexual harassment, child abuse and domestic violence; and the moral questions raised by victimization, victim hood, bystander denial and public accountability.

For more than a year, images from the courtroom aroused denial and obsession. In trailers, apartments and houses across the country, Enquiring minds--most of them female, few of them wealthy and 20% of them African American--wanted to know; so did readers of the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, the New York Times--most of them white and middle-class, and a slim majority of them male.

It was a trial that raised uncomfortable questions about class, sex and race--questions the mainstream press often seemed too embarrassed to acknowledge, much less answer. In a county so broke that it almost had to close some of its public health clinics, the case asked about the justice money can buy. In a landscape where people feel anonymous and neighbor-less, it murmured about the insulating power of being well-known. 

At a time when every shared assumption between men and women is up for renegotiation, it was about a marriage in which a rich black daddy paid the bills and a white mommy stayed home and got hit.

To cover such a story, idols had to be pulled from pedestals. Reporters were forced to enter a world where the line between public and private life blurred, the social face revealed its intimate shadow, sex was involved and male-on-female violence lay at the heart of the matter. It was the landscape where the National Enquirer functions best.

Reporters at the tabloid never felt the Simpson story, the one that began long before the double murders, was too trashy to cover. Last year, when Enquirer reporters got to the townhouse on South Bundy shortly after coroners' deputies, they were already armed with sources and leads: In 1989, O.J. Simpson's conviction for wife-beating had barely rated a mention in most newspapers, but the Enquirer, ever mindful of its 67% female readership, gave it a full page: O.J. Simpson Charged With Wife-Beating--the Shocking Details!

When the Simpsons divorced two years later, Enquirer reporters read the court filings. By 1993, their articles make it clear that they were wired into a network of "insiders" among the Simpsons' friends, and they covered the couple's brief reconciliation. 

If other newspapers had taken the Simpsons' violent marriage as seriously as the Enquirer did, said Dr. Joyce Brothers in one story, Nicole Brown Simpson might well be alive today.

After the killings, the Enquirer wasted no time running stories about O.J.'s athletic career or quotes from bewildered business associates who'd never seen him angry. Its first eight-page spread had details as accurate and seemingly trivial as Nicole's trip out for ice cream the night of her murder and as telling as her statements that she was battered and feared that O.J. was stalking her and would kill her. 



"Nobody exists in a vacuum," says Perel. "Whatever you do, somebody knows about it. And yes, we will pay for interesting, correct information."

Within a month of the slayings, the Enquirer reported that not only had Simpson bought a knife, he had also been trained--for a now-shelved NBC-TV drama called "Frogmen"--to slit a human throat and muffle screams. Its reporters found Nicole's housekeeper before police did and paid her $18,000 for an interview. (She said that Simpson, after terrifying and hurting his former wife, would sometimes send her flowers.)

In November, 1994, months ahead of any other news organization and after DNA tests were completed, the Enquirer accurately reported that blood found in Simpson's white Bronco was a match with Ron Goldman's and Nicole Brown Simpson's. Later, it printed photographs of Simpson wearing a tight pair of gloves similar to the now-famous Aris Lights.

All through the year, I read the Enquirer's stories in the checkout line. Some were ridiculous--photographs of prosecutor Marcia Clark sunbathing on a St.-Tropez beach--many others were unabashedly pro-woman and pro-victim. 

One story quoted members of Nicole's therapy group who said a "nightmare therapist" had told Nicole that her body language made O.J. want to hit her; its reporters got psychologists to talk about why athletes seem prone to domestic violence, and published advice for battered women.

Single issues like Nicole's Secret Life occasionally boosted circulation above its average of 3.3 million, but even the biggest Simpson blockbusters never brought the Enquirer close to the 6 million in sales achieved by the 1977 issue that featured a photo of Elvis in his coffin. Nevertheless, the stories brought unheard-of attention from the mainstream press. 

Last December, New York Times reporter David Margolick--a graduate of Stanford University Law School who had covered the William Kennedy Smith and Lorena Bobbitt trials--paid the Enquirer the ultimate compliment by citing its astonishing report that a jail guard had overheard O.J. Simpson blurt out, "I did it!" to minister and former football player Roosevelt Grier.

"It was from a source that had proven itself reliable in the Simpson case, and I'd be doing my readers a disservice if I didn't mention it," Margolick told themedia critic for the Washington Post. "We can all pretend this publication doesn't exist and isn't beating us, but that's not doing anybody any favors."

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